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on the northeast coast of japan. >> thanks very much. it's obviously a desperately worrying time for for them and out to them all. >>>. >> translator: we need now for everybody to move out of the 20 kilometer radius from the number one plant. and in areas from 20 to 30 kilometers from the power plant depending on what happens at the power plant. we would like to ask you to remain indoors at home or in your offices. >> words of warning from japan's prime minister after a fire broke out of the fukushima nuclear power plant. this is the area affected. it's now day four for an earthquake and tsunami rocked the country. >> from cnn london, i'm nina del santos. >> you're watching cnn's continuing coverage of the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami in japan. and we begin with key new developments. the japanese government says there has been a surge in radiation levels outside japan's fukushima nuclear power plant. and as a precaution, officials are telling everyone within a 30-kilometer radius to remain indoors. japan's official death toll from friday's quake and tsunami stands at 2,500, with mo
>> susie: the world watches japan as questions mount about the human tragedy and the potential damage to the global economic recovery. >> the global recovery will not be derailed by the events in japan, given everything we know today. >> susie: from the auto industry in japan to the future of nuclear energy here in the u.s., we continue our coverage of japan's massive earthquake. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off tonight. it's day four of japan's monstrous earthquake and tsunami, and the full brunt of the damage is still unknown. the death toll is expected to exceed 10,000 and the country continues to battle the threat of a catastrophic nuclear accident. now japan is focused on the enormous human suffering, but attention aroun
edition of "world business today" as cnn continues its coverage of the earthquake and tsunami in japan. >>> sea walter being poured from helicopters on to japan's damaged nuclear reactors. that is the scene on thursday. engineers attempt once again to avert catastrophic radiation leaks. the japanese military is dropping tons of water on to two of the six reactors at the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant trying to cool the plant's fuel rods. but the company that runs the plant now reports that the radiation levels actually increased. they're also bringing in police, water cannon. officials say radiation levels right now are too high for personnel to venture inside. >> translator: spence force conducted a spring of water from the air. and the police are also going to start the water spraying by the water cannon trucks. so we're trying to combine the two approaches to maximize the effect of water spraying. >> hundreds of thousands of residents in the area have been evacuated. many are seeking refuge in public shelters. japan ordered people to move at least 20 kilometers away from the plant.
states to our special cover of the disaster in japan. there are new reports a third reactor in fukushima may be in trouble. authorities say the cooling system on daiichi's number two reactor has stopped working and pressure is building up. this follows a fresh blast in the area that houses reactor number three. six people were injured in that explosion. the likely cause was a hydrogen buildup. radiation contamination levels are being tested. they did rise after the incident but the chief cabinet secretary says he does not believe there is a leak. 2,000 bodies have been found in two locations in miyagi prefecture. 1,600 deaths are confirmed with 2,000 injured, at least 1700 people are missing. more on the compromised nuclear power plant in fukushima. the cooling system of reactor two stopped working today and pressure has been building up inside. this marks the third reactor in trouble there. matthew chance is in moscow to explain the differences. matthew, first of all, there have been concerns. people living in the area don't believe what they are being told by the safety agencies there
, this is the toughest and the most difficult crisis for japan. >>> japanese leaders try to move their people forward from one of the country's darkest hours, but there is still a very long way to go. tv is pointing another 6.0 magnitude. it's 5:00 p.m. right now. from cnn hong kong i'm andrew stevens. >> we welcome you to cnn special coverage in japan. >>> now, as the days pass in japan, the death toll continues to climb. friday's earthquake and tsunami have claimed 1,600 lives so far, 1,500 are still missing. those figures are expected to drive dramatically. pictures like this. the devastation of sendai serves as a reminder of the sheer force of the tsunami that inundated them. the situation is bleak for those who have survived as well as survivors are staying in makeshift shelters like this one at a school recovering from the trauma of the past four days and now waiting for news of loved ones. and on top of all that, this japan is racing against the clock to contain what could become a nuclear crisis. images like this have become all too familiar, the white smoke billowing over northeast japan aft
: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska or u.s. territories in the pas civic. >> susie: besides japan's nuclear crisis a big spike in the japanese yen is creating a currency crisis. finance ministers from a
in japan. and just moments ago, a somber message from japan's emperor in a rare but brief public address live on television. the emperor said he was praying for the safety of those affected by last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami. the japanese government is telling residents within a 10-kilometer radius of a second nuclear plant to evacuate. meanwhile workers have returned to the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant after the government lifted a plant evacuation order because radiation levels were dangerously high. concern continues to grow over the safety of spent nuclear fuel rods at that facility. and authorities are investigating the cause of white smoke or possibly steam rising from the plant's number three nuclear reactor. a top government official says radiation levels around the plant still fluctuate, but it's unclear why. >> translator: one thing i would like to confirm, now this increase in radiation reading and in number three reactor, the containment vessel is it possible that the containment vessel has failed? well, number three reactor needed to have water injected. an
, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. this morning, the situation at japan's crippled fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant has gone from critical to desperate. the plant has suffered severe damage and so far, efforts to gain control have failed. here's the latest. a surge in radiation levels forced the remaining workers at the plant to temporarily withdraw. early this morning, a second fire broke out at reactor number four. this one may involve the outer shell of the containment building. and japanese officials also say the outer containment building of another reactor may have been compromised. charlie d'agata is in takasaki japan with more this morning. he joins us. good morning, charlie, what's the latest there? >> good morning to you, betty. the latest is, thankfully, the fire is out, and the plant's operators said they've been able to stabilize the temperature and the pressure in that critical unit. the reactor has gone -- at the same time the japanese government said it's now time to ask the military for help. efforts to prevent a full-blown nuclear disaster suf
in japan. tasteless jokes. >> unbelievable news and disturbing news about a member of the charlie's angels cast. charlie sheen couldn't stay out of "the skinny" long. Ñ Ñ Ñ Ñ ÑÑ ♪ skinny so skinny >>> well, this was a big talker on facebook with our facebook fans yesterday. this gilbert gottfried comments, he made tasteless jokes about the tsunami in japan. some kind of joke he tweeted about, you know, a just broke up with my girlfriend but as the japanese say, another one will float by. really tasteless -- >> in japan, the beach comes to you, you don't go to the beach. >> he was the voice of aflac duck and they stepped in and said, not funny and canned him. he apologized saying, i sincerely apologize to anyone who was offended by my attempt at humor regarding the tragedy in japan. i meant no disrespect and my thoughts are with victims and their families. on top of that, some folks have rushed to his side saying, wait a minute, this isn't right, including joan rivers and howard stern. howard says here is a guy as long as i can remember making jokes about the n-word, jews. i mean, y
has been evacuated. japan says the amount of radiation leaked is small. the u.s. navy is repositions away from the plant after low levels of radiation found on crew members who took place in a relief mission. correspondents are in place all over the nation. you will hear from them throughout the day. >>> a new explosion at an already damaged nuclear plant has japan and the world on edge. this is from the fukushima daiichi plant. we understand the fuel rods were exposed at reactor number two. that is dangerous. it could mean big problems down the road. according to the "new york times" the "uss ronald reagan" sailed into a radioactive cloud and crew members were exposed to low level radiation and had to be treated. now the "uss ronald reagan" is moving out to sea. here is stan grant and what he had to say about the threat of a nuclear crisis. >> we have been focusing on the one and three reactor at the daiichi plant. the number two cooler was knocked out. that is dangerous territory if the water level drops too quickly. as they did with one and three, they pumped sea water into reacto
out of japan. >>> it is 2:00 a.m. tuesday in japan where fears of a nuclear meltdown are only part of the national nightmare, and maybe not even the biggest part. twice now since friday's catastrophe earthquake and tsunami, explosions have rocked the nuclear plant 40 miles south of sendai. you can see the smoke in the distance. the latest happened just hours ago, injuring workers, knocking out the cooling system for another reactor that had been mostly unscathed. workers are scrambling and right now failing to keep the reactor cool from sea water. we'll get much more in a live report in just a moment. >>> elsewhere the focus is people, finding them, saving them, feeding them, reuniting them. it's being done with boats, helicopters and even bicycles. this man has been riding from one shelter to another in search of his wife. 2,000 japanese are unaccounted for. still survivors who have nothing else are refusing to let go of hope. >> translator: i'm looking for my daughter. our home is gone so she wouldn't know where to go. as other family members are safe, i only hope my daughter is
urbiam >>> it's 4:00 p.m. in japan on a day where many japanese try to get back to work following friday's historic earthquake and tsunami. but at this point, there is no escape from the heartbreak and the troubles afflicting a nation so overwhelmed by catastrophe. hello, i'm andrew stevens from cnn's studios in hong kong welcoming this hour, our viewers in the u.s. as around the world. well, there are also reports of more trouble at the nuclear plant in fukushima. japanese media are reporting the cooling system has stopped at one of the reactors there. let's get straight to stan grant. he is following that story from our tokyo bureau, and he joins us live now. stan? >> reporter: yeah, this continues to grow, doesn't it, andrew? this entire nuclear emergency. it seems to be one development after another. and none of them particularly good. we're hearing now about the number 2 reactor at the daiichi nuclear plant. this makes three of the reactors there, 1, 2, and 3 that are experiencing these cooling problems. now this information is being reported in japanese media and they're clo
listening in on the news conference of japan's chief cabinet secretary yukio edano. he'll be giving ugs the latest developments at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. >> translator: reportedly iaea suggested the japanese government issue an evacuation order. what do you say? >> translator: yes, the iaea has been conducting a soil survey, and one of the sample readings have exceeded iaea recommended leve levels, and it's been advised to the japanese government that we should take careful decisions based on these sampling results, and they will -- we have been continuing the atmospheric radiation surveys near the site and the iaea sampling results will also be taken into consideration for further detailed monitoring on the part of the japanese government. and as to the radiation levels in soil, this has exceeded the recommended limits. if the health hazard can develop to humans who stay near the site for prolonged periods of time, but there is no immediate health hazards if the exposure will continue for a prolonged period of time, the impact can occur. we will continue the ongoing
>>> the experts are down playing concerns about radiation reaching california as japan suspends helicopter air drops at the crippled nuclear plant. good evening everyone i'm frank somerville. >> and i'm julie haener. low levels of radiation from japan are riding the winds over the pacific tonight. sounds ominous but is it? debra villalon joins us tonight where the department of health is monitoring the air for radiation levels in the area. >> reporter: the department is monitoring changes in the atmosphere. if the radiation does arrive, scientists here will be among the first to know. it's expected to hit our coast as early as tomorrow. so diluted. radiation will be more minuscule than measurable. >> we understand everybody's concern, radiation is scary stuff. >> reporter: officials cannot say it enough, they see no health hazards. >> i'm not sure that the vision or the model of a plume this far away is -- >> no one can predict what is going to happen at the plant tomorrow. >> reporter: that uncertainty is why so much technology at so many locations is aimed at sniffing out radi
's breaking coverage of the unprecedented quake disaster in japan. >> frantic search and rescue operations are currently under way. 36 hours after that massive earthquake and tsunami tore through the country. right now it is 3:00 a.m. there and there's growing concern about fuel and food shortages. humanitarian aid is on the way from the u.s. and other countries. with so many roads damaged, the challenge will be getting all of that aid to the people who need it. more than 200 aftershocks have jolted japan since the quake hit, and some of them quite powerful. several happened near a nuclear plant where one reactor has been overheating since friday's earthquake. >> officials say an explosion there involved an outer building, not any of the reactors. people living within 12 miles of the plant have been told to evacuate. before nightfall, more than 3,000 people were rescued across the country. the death toll has topped 900. and officials now fear it could grow higher. we're getting new video in from japan and it really is something to watch. take a look. >> ireporter aaron sent this to us. he
ever recorded. it sparked fires across japan, including the one you say. this is an oil refinery near tokyo. you have to worry about the flooding issue, a major problem in and around tokyo. there's still fires that are blazing out of control all over the place. tokyo, the surrounding states to it. i was watching on your broadcast some of the pictures. you had an airport that was up there. that was actually the airport that is a very, very new airport that was built, that's right on the ocean line there. that's why it was so devastated. >> we're showing the video that came into our newsroom a little while ago. you can see the pacific ocean in the background and the tsunami wave and this is mid wave, you can see if you're looking at h.d., screen left, part of the runway still not covered. don't exactly know where any of the airplanes are. maybe there was a bit of a warning. how long was the warning, tom, between the time the earthquake hit at 2:46 p.m. local time and it was an 8.9 magnitude. largest that started there in japan. how much warning between the earthquake hitting and the ts
the will and the determination to come back after something like this, it is japan. and we'd like to encourage you to help them. they need it. we've made it really easy for you. just go to our web page cnn.com/impact. >>> and now it's time for me to pass it over to brooke baldwin. brooke, you can't help but want to help these people when you look at these images? >> absolutely. cnn.com/impact. thank you, randi. >>> i want to begin this newscast today with an image i cannot shake. an entire village wiped out in 90 seconds. 90 seconds for the ocean to swell and overtake this one town while those who live there, those who had moved quickly enough, watched from higher ground. watch this with me. >> doesn't that just take your breath away? imagine you're one of the fortunate perched atop this hill watching your home, your town, people scrambling in the bottom left watching it all being wiped away. that was friday in miyagi prefecture. the twin forces in that tsunami were just the beginning. look at this. we have the satellite photo from digital globe and it shows the damage to the reactors at the fukushima daiichi
>> 1:00 a.m. tomorrow in japan. back live in japan and the entire world continue to deal with the emic disaster. shock waves are everywhere. new tsunami have been renewed after stronger after shocks. it is forcing people to leave and seek emergency shelter. a million people have no water or power. air travel to and from japan is a mess. tonight, the airport has been swamped and for the most part all but closed. major airports are hoped even though there are hundreds of flight delays and cancellations. things are happening in wisconsin. it could be high up in the head lines if not for the tragedy. union and supporters are garey -ing up for the biggest protest rally yet. we'll take you there when it kicks off. there could be 100,000's that protest the crack down on the unions signed by law. breaking news on japan first and reports at this hour that that nuclear accident in japan that crippled two power plants is serious that country's officials and not the magnitude of three mile island of this country in 1979 or chernobyl in 1986. cooling water is pumped in the existing fa
're not sure exactly what's happening right now at a crippled nuclear plant in japan but it looks like things are getting a lot worse. >> reporter: cal state orders all of the students study in japan to come home. how the uc policy differs drastically. that and more. "mornings on 2" starts right now. >>> good morning. i'm dave clark. >> i'm tori campbell. >>> there's some rain showers coming down. let's get right to steve. >>> well, it's ended now. it's more drizzly, light rain. there's not a lot going on. the computer shows the system moving through. there will be drier air coming in behind that. we're not done yet. there is a little bit of rain towards the east bay but everything seems to be falling apart. towards the south bay there's been light showers, back to the mountains. peninsula, things are on dry side. as we go out wide, you can see there's nothing out in the north bay. >> the roads are wet. so sal has an update on that. >>> this is on the border of orinda and la fayette. this has traffic backed up all the way out to walnut creek. that's a good long way. it's backed up past the ha
in the united states and around the world to our special coverage of the disaster in japan. it is midafternoon there right now and we want to bring you up to date on information that we have from a nation overwhelmed by two disasters as well as concern and anxiety over an emergency at a nuclear plant. six people have been injured in a new explosion in northeastern japan. it was a hydrogen blast occurring at the building that houses the number three reactor within the country's daveny nuclear plant. now, officials say the number three reactor was not damaged in today's explosion. also a horrific discovery. they found 2,000 bodies at northern japan's miyagi prefecture which was the hardest hit during friday's massive earthquake and tsunami. those bodies tragically add to the official death toll of more than 1600 and all-out search for survivors is still under way. well, cnn's stan grant is in tokyo following the latest developments at the two nuclear power plants that were damaged by the earthquake and tsunami and he joins us now. of course, we mention those two emergencies, want to go first to
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: japan raced to prevent a radiation catastrophe today as explosions rocked two reactors at a nuclear plant, and government officials urged 140,000 people near the facility to remain inside. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the rescue efforts in towns along the coast, even as the nation was hit by another powerful aftershock. and the official death toll topped 3,000, with many more homeless. >> brown: we assess the magnitude of the crisis and what's being done to avert a full nuclear meltdown. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines the economic impact of the disaster, as stock markets plunge in japan and around the world. >> brown: plus, paul solman tells the tale of two ohio counties-- once very similar economically, now far apart. >> you could go to a lot of placess around the country and they're living in one high- income reality and a couple counties away it's a whole different world. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's newshour. major fundi
economic toll. today the u.s. stock market closed sharply lower. japan the world's largest economy accounts for 10% of u.s. exports. >>catherine: today officials ditch to plan and try to use helicopters to pour water into a nuclear reactor. the fire is out, there is still a lot of concern that the water to boil away. here's a timeline of events of the nuclear plant that has the world on edge. the 9.0 earthquake hits off the coast friday. the nuclear plant is in one of the hardest hit areas. the quake and tsunami knocked out regular and backup cooling systems to reactors one and three. workers began injecting sea water and boron and reactors to prevent a meltdown. saturday afternoon, a hydrogen buildup leads to an explosion. blowing the roof off the no. 1 reactor building, for workers heard. midday monday, another explosion tears through the reactor number three building. the roof and topples are destroyed, 11 people hurt. late monday, reactor no. 2 loses its cooling capability. workers in jagged see water and boron into that reactor as well. tuesday morning, an explosion in its the
of positive news in japan's struggle to avoid a nuclear meltdown. we're just getting word that a new power line to the truck fukushimi -- >> reporter: crews tried to cool reactors after white clouds drifting from one reactor believed to be leaking radiation forced japanese workers to temporarily eevacuate. >> translator: if the fuel rod gets exposed, it can become fragile and there is a chance of that rod breaking once any shock is given. >> reporter: japanese helicopters pulled out of wednesday's mission following the release of steam of the vessel of reactor number 3 which top government officials report was not damaged. during an extremely rare address to the nation, japan's emperor now address the crisis. >> translator: i'm deeply concerned about the nuclear situation because it's unpredictable. >> reporter: he offers con dole licenses to the victims of last -- con dole licenses to the victims of -- con dole licenses to the victims of the tragedy -- condolences to the victims of the tragedy last week. the quake hit, following a tsunami and survivors are still being found. >> the chanc
of the international atomic energy agency, yukiya amano, says he's starting to see some positive developments in japan's efforts to stabilize the crippled nuclear power plant. amano made the remark in an emergency iaea board meeting in vienna on monday. the meeting opened way silent prayer for victims of the great east japan earthquake. amano told participants that he and prime minister naoto kan agreed last week that japan will speed up information about the crisis at the fukushima daiichi plant. amano said the situation at the plant remains very serious but some positive developments have been seen. officials later briefed a working-level meeting on how the crisis developed at the plant and their plan to restore cooling systems for reactors. >> one of the issues that have been discussed is that this is some -- the safety standard is not mandatory, voluntary, but there is some also argument or views that this should be mandatory. >> the iaea has already sent a team of experts to japan. the organization plans to send more nuclear and radiation experts on japan's request. >>> the death toll from the qu
of storm systems moving in and it will be wet. >> thanks, leigh. >>> now to japan where a second explosioning roughed the -- rocked the nuclear plant about four hours ago. the hydrogen blast sent up a massive column of smoke in the air. japanese officials say radiation levels are still within legal limits. more than 180,000 people have been evacuated from that area in the past three days. abc's diana alvear is in japan. >> within seconds the scene changed dramatically. feciales reported another explosion at the nuclear facility. >> either over the next 24-48 hours they will get control of the reactors or they will get a meltdown at one or more of the reactors. >> minutes earlier, warnings of a possible second tsunami, a false alarm, but no less frightening. the impact of the explosion was not immediately clear, but the message of the survivors from the initial disaster was, sos, help. however, the mission to deliver that help has not been easy. one dramatic rescue was successful. elderly passengers pulled from their car where they have been trapped for 20 hours with no food or wa
, we'll bring that to you live. in japan today here, the focus really is on this number 3 reactor. that is where we saw the video. you see it here of these helicopters dropping water. sea water in this attempt to cool it off and prevent a possible meltdown. tokyo electric or tepco is in this desperate rush to build a power line so the fukushima daiichi plant can power up its cooling systems once again. later on in this newscast, i'll be speaking with a man, an american man who was inside one of the facility, actually in a building next to one of the reactors working when the quake hit last friday. >> cracks were opening up on the ground. i looked over at the buildings around me and glass was breaking, lights, sirens, people screaming. >> can you imagine? he's a software engineer there for a couple weeks working on the power plant's computers. he has not spoken to cn nyet. but he will on this tram. we will also check in with our team in tokyo where shrinking supplies of food and gases are a growing concern. >>> a lot of ground to cover here. right off the bat, i want to show you so
on "america this morning" and "good morning america," we'll take you back to japan for the very latest on the ongoing disaster. >>> in other news, the persian gulf nation of bahrain is under a three month state of emergency. a reaction to what's escalated into deadly political unrest. demonstrators are calling for political reforms and a change in bahrain's long established monarchy. the military force led by saudi arabia has been clashing with the protesters. so far at least three people have died and hundreds more injured. the u.s. navy's main base in the region is located in bahrain. >>> and in libya, moammar gadhafi's forces appear set for an offensive on the main stronghold of the rebellion there. opposition fighters were routed from a key city yesterday opening the way to their base in benghazi. in his newest comment gadhafi called the rebels rats and also claimed only hundreds not thousands have been killed in the fighting. >>> and with that, here's a look at your wednesday weather. a wet day from san francisco north with seattle expecting heavy rain. up to 2 feet of snow in the
. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 point. it mentioned it opened down nearly 300 points earlier. today one of the biggest aftershocks to hit japan s
in that country. stocks continue to teeter, could japan's economy cause the u.s. to stumble? we'll look into that. moments ago, a new after shock described by our msnbc team in tokyo as huge and lasting a long time here, we'll hear from chris jansing on that in a home. the threat of a nuclear catastrophe still surrounds japan and a cloud of fear here. the world is watching closely those nuclear reactors at the fukushima plant. 50 workers were ordered out when things got dicey. now they're going back in at great personal risk to try and figure out how to get a handle on things. fires, explosions, and radiation leaks remain a constant threat. it seems no one can predict how this situation will end. the u.s. army trying to ramp up its humanitarian effort to help the people of japan. more than 10,000 people already listed missing or dead. half a million have been evacuated and the cost of the destruction could top $100 billion. the sato family was lucky enough to survive. but when they were returned to their neighborhood, they found there is nothing left for them, their entire town is destroyed, gone
>>> your realtime captioner is linda marie macdonald. >>> with things getting worse at japan's stricken nuclear power plant, the u.s. is arranging charter flights for americans who want to leave japan. i'm charlie d'agata in yoshita, japan, with the story coming up. >> the desperate search for loved ones during japan's worst crisis since world war ii. good morning, it is thursday, march 17, 2011, st. patrick's day. i'm sydnie kohara. >> hi, everybody. i'm frank mallicoat. it's 4:30. a good day to be hoop fans. we have a lot of basketball here on cbs. >> weather-wise, we have a lot of rain don't we, lawrence. >> all this rain is going to make everything nice and green around the bay area. yeah, happy st. patrick's day, folks. if you are heading out, things are going to be mostly dry today. but we do have a chance of a few showers north of the golden gate bridge. behind that, though, we have a significant storm system. that one is on the way. looks like friday could be a very wet and wild day around the bay area. we'll have more on that coming up. right now, let's get a check o
of the catastrophe unleashed by friday's earthquake and tsunami in japan. officials estimate the death toll could exceed 10,000, as the nation struggles with a mounting economic, nuclear, and humanitarian crisis. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have on the ground reports from several towns on japan's northeastern coast, where the search for survivors continues. >> ifill: we update the international rescue effort aimed at getting food, shelter, and medical help to victims. >> suarez: and we talk to newshour science correspondent miles o'brien and radiation expert david brenner about the state of japan's nuclear reactors. >> ifill: plus, margaret warner examines saudi arabia's military move into neighboring bahrain after a weekend of protests. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as the markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has
welcome viewers to our continuing coverage of the aftermath of the earthquake in japan. it has been 48 hours of hell for japan, the country is reeling from the double blow of the huge earthquake and tsunami that followed. one of the biggest concerns right now is the threat of nuclear complications. more on that in a moment. first, japan's emergency headquarters says the death toll has just passed 800. that is a number certain to rise. at least 678 are confirmed missing. more than 1400 listed as injured. those numbers only hint at the devastation. one japanese news agency reports 10,000 people missing from one town alone. local media is already reporting word from the prime minister that more than 3,000 people have been rescued. our paula hancocks to arrive in minamisanriku. she reports half of the town's 18,000 residents are simply missing. it's a town that had 18,000 citizens. that would mean 9,500 people still missing. let me get out of the shot so you can have a look at just how badly this area is damaged. where we're standing here is on the edge of town. you can see a couple of hou
six >> mark: a.m., the latest out of japan forcing japan's workers to evacuate the power plant. the steps being taken to get them back in. >> darya: travelers are anxious to get out of japan amid fears of reactioradiation contaminati >> mark: the new killer crisis in japan is our top story at 6:00 a.m. >> darya: we are going attack the latest in japan in just one minute. >> mark: first and early check gone bay area weather. >> james: those rainshowers seem to be pushing off at this point. we are not seeing a lot in the area of rain. 680 north of martinez looks like it may be getting rain. walnut creek expecting showers momentarily. otherwise they will taper off, but it won't last long. more heavier rain said it not for friday much more coming up in a bit. >> erica: crosstown freeways no problems here, but i might have bought spot for the moral saw a tall you wear street dead. >> mark: the team that has been working to prevent a meltdown in the new fuel plant is getting ready to go back into the plant to try and cool the reactor spirit they were evacuated today. more smoke is ri
in japan where it morning now and smoke is still billowing from a damaged nuclear power plant. workers have been trying everything to cool reactors there. but at this point, they're not even sure if their methods are working. the plan now to use fire trucks to spray even more water on that plant. president obama is assuring americans, meanwhile, that harmful doses of radiation will not make it to the united states. here in the bay area, air quality leaders are monitoring radiation levels, and so far everything is normal. but some people aren't taking chances. many getting out. nbc bay area's george kiriyama who is first bay area reporter on the scene there in japan when the disaster unfolded, well, tonight he's back and he's sharing his experience with us coming up in just moments. >> now george left japan because of concerns over radiation but it seems those concerns have followed him stateside. many people in the bay area are wondering, just what risk do we face? >> well, tracking that impact of the radiation from japan. one dispersion model. that's actually the name. shows slightly eleva
>>> the death toll rises in japan amid the quake and tsunami devastation. today, worries are growing about the crisis at nuclear plants. >>> in just minutes, local leaders will be meeting to discuss the disaster situation in japan. we'll show you how you can help. >>> as the damage cleanup resumes today in santa cruz, we now have this video of the moment the surge of waves hit the harbor. that story and more on ktvu channel 2 news at noon. >>> good afternoon. topping our news, the u.s. is stepping up relief efforts to help japan recover from last week's massive earthquake and tsunami. the death toll also continues to rise and concern is growing over the threat of a possible nuclear plant meltdown. craig boswell begins our coverage with this report. >> reporter: just days after the devastating and deadly earthquake and tsunami in japan, help is arriving. two u.s. search and rescue teams are on the ground to assist operations from dozens of other countries. 75-member u.s. teams include at least 12 rescue dogs from los angeles. >> the united states will continue to offer any
>>> four days into an epic disaster. a growing crisis in japan triggering worldwide concern. new explosions shaking japan's crippled nuclear industry all while hundreds of bodies begin washing up onshore. the horror is unimaginable. >>> and thanks for being with us on this monday, march 14th, it's 6:00 a.m. here on the east coast, 7:00 p.m. in tokyo. we're following the developments of this unfolding catastrophe in japan. >> the tsunami's fury in japan becoming clearer this morning. a new day brings new fears of a nuclear disaster now. overnight, another explosion at the fukushima nuke particular plant. radiation levels were detected. this is being called the greatest hardship there since world war ii. hundreds of thousands of people in need. there are long lines at gas stations and at food stores, people are waiting and waiting. there is a shortage of food and water this morning. >>> also, an overwhelming sense of despair as we said, bodies washing up onshore, the number of dead continuing to mount, and also the financial cost. losses from the quake and tsunami could total $100
. this is abc news, japan. >> she just mentioned iodine tablet. one pharmacy we spoke to in santa cruz says there they have been sold out of tablet because of concern about radiation. public health experts say there is very little risk of the radioactive material actually reaching california unless the disaster gets worse in japan. even then the public health threat probably we are told by experts would be very small. one expert at lawrence livermore lab told us tonight that particle from asia could reach the united states in about 80 hours but that depend on the jet stream. talk about the jet stream and weather pattern involved here we'll turn to our weather expert spencer christian who is watching that for us tonight. >> let me start by shoying the current position of the jet stream and let's talk about how useful the jet stream is as tool and weather forecasting. narrow band in powerful wind. steering current for the weather system and jet stream can be forceful with winds up to 300 miles per hour and much mild we are winds down to 100 miles per hour so that could cause moisture or w
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